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Javascript to split string into array of characters

If you're working with JavaScript, you may occasionally need to take a string and split it into an array of individual characters. While this might seem like a simple task, there are actually a few different ways to accomplish this. In this article, we'll take a look at a few different ways to split a string into an array of characters.
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Solution 1: Split string into an array of characters using the spread operator

The spread operator can be used to split a string into an array of characters. This is a useful way to access individual characters in a string or to perform operations on a string one character at a time.

Syntax

[...str]

Code example

str = "Devsheet";

const arr = [...str];

console.log(arr)

Output

["D","e","v","s","h","e","e","t"] 

Live demo

The code above is an example of using the spread operator to split a string into an array of characters. The spread operator essentially "unpacks" the string into an array of individual characters.

Solution 2: Using Array.from() function

If you have a string and want to create an array of characters from that string, you can use the Array.from() function. This function takes in a string and returns an array of characters.

For example, if you have a string "Hello world", you can use Array.from() to create an array of characters like so:

var chars = Array.from("Hello world");

console.log(chars); // ['H', 'e', 'l', 'l', 'o', ' ', 'w', 'o', 'r', 'l', 'd']

You can also use Array.from() to split a string into an array of words. To do this, you would pass in the string as the first argument and a function as the second argument. This function would take in a character and return true if it's a space character.

For example:

var words = Array.from("Hello world", function(char) {

return char === " ";

});

console.log(words); // ['Hello', 'world']

Code example

str = "Devsheet";

const arr = Array.from(str);

console.log(arr);

Output

["D","e","v","s","h","e","e","t"]

Live demo

In the above code example

  1. The first line declares a string variable named str and assigns it the value "Devsheet".
  2. The second line declares a constant array variable and assigns it the value of the string variable converted to an array using the Array.from() method.
  3. The third line logs the value of the array variable to the console.

Solution 3: Using split() function in Javascript

The split() function in Javascript is used to split a string into an array of characters. This function is used to split a string into an array of substrings, and return the new array. The split() function is used to split a string into an array of characters. The split() function takes two arguments: the first is the separator to use, and the second is the limit to the number of substrings to return.

Code example

str = "Devsheet";

const arr = str.split('');

console.log(arr);

Output

["D","e","v","s","h","e","e","t"]

The code above will take the string "Devsheet" and split it into an array of individual letters.

Solution 4: Using regex and split() function

If you want to split a string into an array of characters, you can use the Javascript split() function and pass in a regular expression to match the characters. For example, if you want to split a string by every letter, you could use the regular expression /(\w)/g and the split() function like this:

str = "Hello World";

const arr = str.split(/(?!$)/u);

console.log(arr);

Output

["H","e","l","l","o"," ","W","o","r","l","d"]

In the above code example

  1. The string "Hello World" is assigned to the variable str.
  2. The string is split into an array of substrings using the regular expression "(?!$)/u". This expression matches any character that is not followed by an end-of-string character.
  3. The resulting array is logged to the console.
str = "Devsheet";

const arr = [...str];

console.log(arr)

// Output
// ["D","e","v","s","h","e","e","t"]
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